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Posts Tagged ‘dixie chicks’

On our way to our gig last night we were listening to some of Don McLean‘s old stuff, which I had recently dug out, and I was touched by the beauty of his art of expression, and most particularly in his anti-war songs like “The Grave,” or “Everybody Loves Me, Baby” etc.

It made me realize how drastically things have changed since the early 70s. People just don’t write lyrics like that anymore. The vast majority have come to accept war as a commodity of life to preserve the Western status quo, or the American Way of life, or whatever.

Instead of rebelling against their governments’ falling into nations that they have no business dropping bombs on, they accept the media hogwash and propaganda of “the enemy” and give their silent consent to the daily mass murder that’s happening on behalf of their tax money.

And that in spite of the lesson we ought to have learned from fairly recent history of what guilt people can collectively heap upon themselves by silently consenting to the evils committed by their governments.

How many church visits will it take to clear a conscience of that burden, that’s mostly not even recognized? How many donations or tithes will it take to buy forgiveness for the silent tolerance of the slaughter perpetrated in the name of us, “the people?”

The closest thing in recent times that I heard to some of the anti-war protest songs from a time when at least a substantial amount of the world population honestly admitted that war was evil and that the U.S. had no business wreaking havoc in Vietnam are songs like Pink’s “Dear Mr.President,” (although the song does not mention anything about American foreign policies, but only deals with domestic issues) and, of course, we’ve got Pearl Jam’s rendition of Dylan’s “Masters of War.” – Oh, and perhaps some of the Dixie Chicks‘ Anti-Bush rantings, for which they’ll always have my respect. Oh, and of course, good ol’ Neil Young’s “Impeach the President,” bless his soul!

Pretty much everyone else that I know of dances to the modern drums of war, or rather, to the tune of “let’s ignore what our country is doing in other countries,” unless another bunch of flag-wrapped coffins arrive at home, that is.

The trademark of the 21st century, thus far: the (cultural) voices of truth have become (nearly) silent. The nations cower in fear of their leaders and follow them like sheep to the slaughter of the innocents.

The problem with that is the universal law of cause and effect as laid down by many spiritual teachers, including Jesus’ follower St. Paul, when he said, “Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.” There’s a cold wind blowin’, and we’re beginning to see the first fruits of our “harvest” in a crumbling economy and a crisis which now has officially exceeded the rank of severity of that of the Great Depression, (along with forecasts of food shortages coming upon us as early as this year, which many of us may find themselves unable to deal with).

Even the young staff of the joint we played in last night acknowledged in a conversation I overheard while packing up our gear, that we’re still going to chew on the repercussions of the current crisis for the next 5, 10 or 15 years, and that even though Europe hasn’t seen the worst of it.

Unfortunately, it will probably take more than a financial crisis for people to wake up and tell their government, “Mr. Obama, don’t follow in the footsteps of your predecessor, and please, stop killing people in Pakistan or Afghanistan.” Or to their most strongly supported ally, Israel, for that matter, “Please stop killing innocent Palestinian children!”

Even more unfortunately, if history continues repeating itself (- and that in such a drastic manner that some people have started to doubt whether history is really real -), then this current crisis, like the one in the 30s, will only lead to more and greater war, greater need for some “culprit” to blame and make pay for the domestic dilemma, greater cries and thirst for blood, and who will be the next people that will answer with a shattering unanimous, roaring “YES!” to the question, “Do you want total war?

Younger people nowadays speak critically of the hippie movement. But you’ve got to give the hippies credit for having had the guts to stand up for their love for peace, for being willing to acknowledge (unlike many supposed “Christians”) the Biblical reality that war is evil, and for being willing to oppose their authorities for their stance against war.
They may be looked upon with ridicule by today’s silent consenters and smug cogs in the machine that have learned to shut up and do as they’re told, but maybe a wiser future generation will look back at those rebels of the 60s and early 70s as the true heroes of the 20th century, and perhaps even as the last of their kind in history as we know it altogether.

In my experiences with abundant acquaintances I’ve come to realize the fact that some people simply refuse to acknowledge the existence and reality of their mistakes, thus depriving themselves of the possibility to ever learn from them, but thus to remain “willingly ignorant,” as the Bible puts it, which Kent Hovind appropriately translated into modern English as “dumb on purpose.”

What if an entire nation or generation chooses to be willingly ignorant, or “dumb on purpose?”

It reminds me of one of those relics from the 60s which may have even sounded a little naive back then, but in the face of the reality of the past 4 decades, acquires a bitter by-taste: “When will they ever learn? – –

When will they ever learn?”

If “there is no peace, saith my God, for the wicked,” then I dare to re-define “the wicked” as “those who want no peace.”

Some of my favorite Anti-War Songs from the 60s and early 70s:

Donovan – The War Drags On


Buffy Sainte Marie – Universal Soldier

Bob Dylan – Masters of War,

Pete Seeger – Where Have All the Flowers Gone

Don McLean – The Grave, Everybody Loves Me

Buffalo Springfield – For What It’s Worth

The Who – Won’t Get Fooled Again

Barry BcGuire – Eve of Destruction

CCR – Fortunate Son

John Lennon – Give Peace a Chance

Rolling Stones – Gimme Shelter

Sam Halbert – Billy

More recent anti-war songs:

Galliano – Prince of Peace

Billy Joel – Goodnight Saigon

Some of my own:

In Thy Skirts

Better Place

Forevermore

The Bible Says

Thou Shalt Love

Indifference

Sarajevo Rain




Wikipedia List of Anti-War Songs

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While browsing for a more reliable source of recommendations for edifying movies than Christianity Today last night (any site rating “Pan’s Labyrinth” higher than “Amazing Grace” must be about as “Christian” as George Bush, and we all ought to know by now how far his “Christianity” really goes), I finally came upon “Crosswalk,” a site not free of the hyper-patriotic and warmongering mindset of US-Insanity Today, either, but at least not as mind-warped & pseudo-intellectually twisted. So, if you’re looking for edifying movies, that’s the site, we’d presently recommend, rather than CT.

Before we found Crosswalk, there were a few other sites, recommending what they considered the “best” movies, say, of 2006, and one recommendation that caught my eye was “Shut Up and Sing,” the documentary with and about the Dixie Chicks, and particularly what happened after their statement in London in 2003, that they were ashamed of Bush being from Texas.

Being a big-mouth-afflicted artist myself, who has refused to go the way of all flesh for the sake of popularity, naturally my heart went out for the girls, and we thoroughly enjoyed watching their metamorphosis from “merely a Country band” into a “furious voice for the truth.

Even though it becomes clear during the course of the film that the Chicks are not promoting Christian values or view points, it’s almost as if God winked an eye and anointed them to a somewhat prophetic voice against the insanity and hypocrisy that so many people have the audacity to actually call “Christianity.”

Of course, the whole incident reminds one of the episode with John Lennon and the Beatles in the 60s, after John’s prognosis that Christianity would vanish, and, after all, they were more famous than Jesus.

I ran a Google check recently, ”Beatles” vs. “Jesus,” and while the Beatles yielded a whopping 54.000.000 results, Jesus took the cake with 180.000.000. So, this just shows how fleeting fame and popularity are in this world. You may be more famous than Jesus one day, but then, never underestimate immortality: it’s got something that’s going to catch up with you sooner or later.

So, in the long run, John was wrong about that one. Nevertheless, he was right about a lot of other things he said. For instance, that New York is like the Rome of today. Or “All You Need Is Love” (providing you truly believe that God IS love, and that He’s capable of supplying all your needs, that is). Or “Give peace a chance!” (Remember, it was the time of the Vietnam war, a situation very similar to the present rape of Iraq).

We Christians have a saying, “There is no peace without the Prince of Peace,” but I also believe that it works the other way around: “Where there’s no peace, there the Prince of Peace isn’t, either,” no matter how ardently one may profess to believe in Him, or claim to have exclusive rights as His representatives on earth.

What people don’t realize is that He Himself prophesied that there would be many speaking and acting in His name, whom He would not recognize as His, but whom He will tell at the end of the world, “Depart from Me; I never knew you!”

Personally, I can’t blame folks for not buying into the kind of “Christianity” most people are selling as such, and I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if what Jesus said comes true, and there will be many from the East and the West, who will enter into His Kingdom before those who call themselves the children of the Kingdom.

As far as I’m concerned, I’d much rather see the Dixie Chicks there than pseudo-pious mass murderers.

I don’t know about you…

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